Month: January 2012

Hollywood Still Hates You

Hollywood continues to completely ignore that lesson. It continues to punish the people who play by the rules with an insufferable customer experience. This is the sole reason piracy is up and profits are down: because doing it right totally sucks. And that’s apparently how the studios want it.

via Apple Outsider » Hollywood Still Hates You.

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Not Piracy

Sites all over the In­ter­net are going dark to show that they ob­ject to leg­is­la­tion cur­rently be­fore the US Con­gress. I’m not Amer­i­can but these words are com­ing at you from a server in LA, so I guess I can weigh in. I’ll limit my dis­cus­sion to one word, “Piracy”; what the “P” stands for in SOPA.

via ongoing by Tim Bray · Not Piracy.

Before Solving a Problem, Make Sure You’ve Got the Right Problem

Some smart thinking from Tim O’Reilly about SOPA

In my experience at OReilly, the losses due to piracy are far outweighed by the benefits of the free flow of information, which makes the world richer, and develops new markets for legitimate content. Most of the people who are downloading unauthorized copies of OReilly books would never have paid us for them anyway; meanwhile, hundreds of thousands of others are buying content from us, many of them in countries that we were never able to do business with when our products were not available in digital form.

via Tim OReilly – Google+ – Before Solving a Problem, Make Sure Youve Got the Right….

‘Misdirection, Doublespeak, Non-Answers, and Straight Up Bad Decisions’

They have really great projects that they start, but they seem to lack on idea of what the use case is, or the follow through needed to make them a success. Search+ seems like one of those things that the engineers pushed through without thinking about the ramifications.

I would argue that this was a decision made by the marketing department, and not by the engineers. If Google was being run my engineers, it might still look like this.

via ‘Misdirection, Doublespeak, Non-Answers, and Straight Up Bad Decisions’ — The Brooks Review.