How the Other Half Works

There is so much that is good in this article. Just perfect really.

When a programmer gets to a certain age, she knows a lot of stuff. But there’s a ton of stuff she doesn’t know, as well, because no one can know even a fraction of everything that’s going on in this industry. It’s far better, unless you’re applying for a junior position, to start at 70 and get credit for everything you do know, than to start at 90 (or even 100) and get debited for the things you don’t know.

via How the Other Half Works: an Adventure in the Low Status of Software Engineers | Michael O. Church.

So I went to North Carolina and drove one of the new Jeep Cherokees…

Man, that was fun to hear, but it was even more fun to do. A few weeks ago, I spent some time out in Raleigh, North Carolina, participating in what felt like a totally surreal experience. Not only did I go on an extended test-drive of the new Cherokee, but I was also interviewed and filmed in a manner akin to being on my own television episode. As an owner of a 1999 Cherokee, I was thrilled when I heard they were bringing the badge back in 2014, and was even more impressed when I saw it in person.

The full story is here, had a blast. Would love to put one in my driveway next to my XJ.

Ten Rules of Success

This was originally from a talk that Adam Savage gave at Boing Boing: Ingenuity over the weekend, it was being passed around the office as something that we have been striving for here at MAKE recently. Wanted to share, as a reminder of what I should be striving for.

  1. Get good at something

    Really good. Get good at as many things as you can. Being good at one thing makes it easier to get good at other things.

  2. Getting good at stuff takes practice.

    Lots and lots of practice.

  3. Get OBSESSED.

    Everyone at the top of their field is obsessed with what they’re doing.

  4. Doing something well and thoroughly is its OWN reward.

  5. Show and Tell.

    If you do something well and you’re happy with it, for FSM’s sake, tell EVERYONE.

  6. If you want something, ASK.

    If something piques your interest, tell someone. If you want to learn something, ask someone, like your BOSS. As an employer, I can tell you, people who want to learn new skills are people I want to keep employed.

  7. Have GOALS.

    Make up goals. Set goals. Regularly assess where you are and where you want to be in terms of them. This is a kind of prayer that works, and works well. Allow for the fact that things will NEVER turn out like you think they will, and you must be prepared to end up miles from where you intended.

  8. Be nice. To EVERYONE.

    Life is way too short to be an asshole. If you are an asshole, apologize.

  9. FAIL.

    You will fail. It’s one of our jobs in life. Keep failing. When you fail, admit it. When you don’t, don’t get cocky. ‘Cause you’re just about to fail again.

  10. WORK YOUR ASS OFF.

    Work like your life depends on it…

via Adam Savage’s Ten Rules for Success

Butterick’s Practical Typography

If that’s im­pos­si­ble, you can still make good ty­pog­ra­phy with sys­tem fonts. But choose wise­ly. And nev­er choose Times New Roman or Arial, as those fonts are fa­vored only by the ap­a­thet­ic and slop­py. Not by ty­pog­ra­phers. Not by you.

Delightful site with the promise that, (a)s you put these five rules to work, you’ll no­tice your doc­u­ments start­ing to look more like pro­fes­sion­al­ly pub­lished material.

via Butterick’s Practical Typography.